Micro Photographic Space Rocks

Photos, Found Things, Tidbits From Exploring The Imagination
Lunch at everybody’s favorite German restaurant, Sausage and More in Lakeside.  #vscocam #FreelancerLunch

Lunch at everybody’s favorite German restaurant, Sausage and More in Lakeside. #vscocam #FreelancerLunch

streetartboulder:

Someone is always watching #graffiti  #art  #vandal  #vandalism #graffiti #skatepark  #boulder #Colorado

streetartboulder:

Someone is always watching #graffiti #art #vandal #vandalism #graffiti #skatepark #boulder #Colorado

streetetiquette:

In and Out • My trip is done finally fulfilled the journey of eating In and Out lol. #healthydiet aha. #vscocam

streetetiquette:

In and Out • My trip is done finally fulfilled the journey of eating In and Out lol. #healthydiet aha. #vscocam

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Working Sketch for 1979 New York Subway Map by Nobu Siraisi
As you might probably guess, I’m not really that fond of the current New York Subway map, although its longevity is certainly to be respected. It was first revealed to the public in 1979, and — despite revisions, service changes and disasters — has remained pretty much the same ever since.
However, this preliminary sketch by designer Nobu Siraisi, collaborating with Michael Hertz on that map, is nothing short of delightful. It looks like it was made in an effort to untangle the web of route lines around the busy Atlantic Avenue station with an eye on label placement as well. Note that the label for Grand Army Plaza station has been erased from the right hand side of the route lines and redrawn to the left. It’s also interesting to see just how much cleaner and legible even this spaghetti-strand map is without the underlying street grid of the full map.
The interview in the Gothamist that this image came from is definitely worth reading, although Michael Hertz certainly has a very rose-tinted view of how his map replaced the Vignelli diagram that came before it.
Source: Gothamist interview with Michael Hertz in 2007, via Aaron Reiss (Twitter)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Working Sketch for 1979 New York Subway Map by Nobu Siraisi

As you might probably guess, I’m not really that fond of the current New York Subway map, although its longevity is certainly to be respected. It was first revealed to the public in 1979, and — despite revisions, service changes and disasters — has remained pretty much the same ever since.

However, this preliminary sketch by designer Nobu Siraisi, collaborating with Michael Hertz on that map, is nothing short of delightful. It looks like it was made in an effort to untangle the web of route lines around the busy Atlantic Avenue station with an eye on label placement as well. Note that the label for Grand Army Plaza station has been erased from the right hand side of the route lines and redrawn to the left. It’s also interesting to see just how much cleaner and legible even this spaghetti-strand map is without the underlying street grid of the full map.

The interview in the Gothamist that this image came from is definitely worth reading, although Michael Hertz certainly has a very rose-tinted view of how his map replaced the Vignelli diagram that came before it.

Source: Gothamist interview with Michael Hertz in 2007, via Aaron Reiss (Twitter)

Thanks @sprntrlsandwich for changing my perception of what is possible with a sandwich! #amazing #nojoke

Thanks @sprntrlsandwich for changing my perception of what is possible with a sandwich! #amazing #nojoke

manvmiles:

Love this… The Adidas Shoebox pop-up store
Not to be outdone by Nike’s heritage VW Camper, Adidas has been demonstrating its own creative PR smarts with this Adidas Originals giant shoebox.
Love the fact it even has a sizing label and the laces sticking out. Very clever.

manvmiles:

Love this… The Adidas Shoebox pop-up store

Not to be outdone by Nike’s heritage VW Camper, Adidas has been demonstrating its own creative PR smarts with this Adidas Originals giant shoebox.

Love the fact it even has a sizing label and the laces sticking out. Very clever.